Is good movie making dead?

GQ: “And no Inception. Now, to be fair, in modern Hollywood, it usually takes two years, not one, for an idea to make its way through the alimentary canal of the system and onto multiplex screens, so we should really be looking at summer 2012 to see the fruit of Nolan’s success. So here’s what’s on tap two summers from now: an adaptation of a comic book. A reboot of an adaptation of a comic book. A sequel to a sequel to an adaptation of a comic book. A sequel to a reboot of an adaptation of a TV show. A sequel to a sequel to a reboot of an adaptation of a comic book. A sequel to a cartoon. A sequel to a sequel to a cartoon. A sequel to a sequel to a sequel to a cartoon. A sequel to a sequel to a sequel to a sequel to a movie based on a young-adult novel. And soon after: Stretch Armstrong. You remember Stretch Armstrong, right? That rubberized doll you could stretch and then stretch again, at least until the sludge inside the doll would dry up and he would become Osteoporosis Armstrong? A toy that offered less narrative interest than bingo?”

He doesn’t mention the horrible 3D trend, which only lends to enhance bad movies and action films. It looks like 2011 and 2012 will be a bit thin on great movies. Then again, we’re all going to die in 2012, right?

Oh, and Stretch Armstrong? Who green lighted that?

One Reply to “Is good movie making dead?”

  1. Summer movies are indeed a wasteland (putting the odd “Inception” aside). But the winter crop was very good — The King’s Speech, Black Swan, True Grit and the Social Network were for me the most _enjoyable_ set of Oscar nom’ed movies for years.

    And the King’s Speech had a budget of $15M and got very good ROI. (The others had very good ROI too.) Let’s hope the beancounters pay attention.

Comments are closed.