Monthly Archives: January 2018

Time for Devin Nunes to go

Fresno Bee: “Nunes of Tulare is sheltered in a relatively safe Republican district, and may believe he will pay no political price for unfairly attacking law enforcement and protecting Trump. But his performance as chairman of the highly sensitive House Intelligence Committee has been nothing short of embarrassing.”

It’s time to vote this guy out. Preferably replaced by someone who will represent the people in his district.

Windows is Amazing

Microsoft Cash Cow.Windows Central: “Before this model, Microsoft had the unified kernel (OneCore), but the OS-level stuff was different across Windows 10 Mobile, Windows 10 PC, Xbox, HoloLens, and Surface Hub. Each one required its own team to maintain. While they all shared the kernel (OneCore) and app layer (UWP) the “middle” of each needed its own engineering team.

With Windows Core OS this model is killed off. The kernel, app layer and now OS-level components are all the same. The one difference will be the shell or the UI. In the Windows Core OS model, these are also referred to as “composers.” For instance, there can be a tablet composer, one for desktop, and one for mobile.”

Back in 2011 I did a bit of speculating about the design of Windows 8 and WinRT. It’s fun to think about overall designs of operating systems and Windows is definitely fun to ponder.

I really love Microsoft’s commitment to making Windows usable by mouse or by touch. I’ve seen plenty of people touching the displays of their Windows based machines and it works just fine. On the desktop it might not be ideal but we’re moving toward a more mobile world, maybe it’s safe to say we’ve already moved to a mobile world? In this world having a touch based device that also has a mouse is ideal. I can dock it at work and use it with my big displays then pack it up and use it at home on the couch as a touch device. This is precisely why I’d love Apple to continue to evolve the iPad into a hybrid that includes a mouse and touch.

I’m a longtime Windows user turned Mac fanatic, but I still think Windows is a great operating system.

Far from perfect

Free Code Camp: “VS Code’s success story is interesting because it’s far from perfect: its UI has that Microsoft-y clunkiness that seems to infect all their products, it’s a big resource hog, and it can be kinda slow to initialize.”

If you go read the article and don’t see the irony in the above statement I’ll point it out for you. Visual Studio Code uses Electron which allows developers to write desktop-like applications in JavaScript. Is the author saying Electron is slow, JavaScript is slow, a combination of the two, or that maybe Microsoft developers made it a fat — slow — pig?

How to be a Podcaster

  1. Record yourself talking about something, anything. Most computing platforms have some way to record your voice.
  2. Publish the MP3 — or other audio file format — somewhere.
  3. Create an RSS file with an enclosure element and put that somewhere on the internet.

You don’t need special services. You don’t need Apple or iTunes but their directory is a great way to get the word out about your podcast. You don’t need a website just for your podcast. If you have a weblog that publishes an RSS feed, you can use that!

Here’s an example podcast. I recorded this with an iOS App called Ferrite, saved it to Google Drive, then copied it to a location on my own server.

If I’ve done everything right you should be able to subscribe to my RSS feed on this site and play it in your favorite podcast player, assuming it supports standard podcasting methods.

Here it is. Enjoy.

The bottom line is this: It’s really EASY to be a podcaster.

Accidental Tech Podcast 255

A wonderful bouquet of flowers.I love me some ATP. The guys consistently teach me something and I really love it when John and Marco get into their rants about the Mac Pro. If you’re not subscribed go subscribe now.

The guys have introduced a new feature to the podcast recently called Ask ATP. I really loved episode 255’s Ask ATP. They got three really interesting questions and I couldn’t resist talking about them a bit. Please listen to the episode for their answers. I’m going to give mine for two and talk a bit about the third one.

Question #1: What if you had to use iOS?

I love this question. With iOS 11 Apple focused a great deal of effort on iPad specific features, but it’s no macOS.

So, what would I need to use iOS as a daily driver? Assuming Xcode existed I’d like a version of iOS that can pair with a full size keyboard, mouse, and display. That’s right, I’d need a mouse. I’ve heard talk of a MacBook-like device running iOS. That would be pretty incredible.

The mythical iBook could be fine for developing iOS Apps, but what about Mac Apps? I suppose they could generate code for a Mac from an iOS version of Xcode but it sure would make testing difficult. I also use VM’s as a part of my day job. Those would go away and that’s fine for an iOS only development platform. I’d probably try it.

Question #2: What if you had to use Windows?

This one is easy for me. In the late 80’s I started my development career writing DOS applications in Microsoft BASIC (not GW BASIC.) In the early 90’s I started learning C and the Windows API — later moving to C++ — and spent the next 25-plus years developing native Windows applications.

I’d be fine moving back to Windows. I think it’s a great operating system. I prefer MacOS these days but I could go back to Windows quite easily. Heck, I still use it in a VM for some backend services work at Agrian.

Question #3: What if you didn’t have advertisers?

This question, in a way, was kind of a bummer. It’s clear the guys do this as a business. That is not a bad thing, at all. A fellas got to make a living but it would definitely stink to see it disappear or go to a subscription model. Not that subscriptions are bad because they’re not. I just have a bit of subscription fatigue so I’d have decide if it were worth subscribing to. Yeah, I’d most likely subscribe.